AnCnoc Cutter ~ 46% (Inver House Distillers Ltd.)

anC Peaty cutter_Both (2)

AnCnoc Cutter ~ 46% (Inver House Distillers Ltd.)

46% ABV, RRP £52 for 70cl

Score: 83/100

anC Peaty cutter_Both (2)

What they say:

The latest expression from anCnoc’s collection of limited edition peated malts was unveiled in Edinburgh last night, as whisky enthusiasts gathered under cover of darkness to share a midnight dram of the smoky new single malt.

anCnoc ‘Cutter’ is officially released to the global market today (1st September), but as the clock chimed to greet the 1st September launch date last night, an intimate group of anCnoc friends and fans stayed up late at the city’s Last Word bar to enjoy a first taste and toast the arrival of this much anticipated new release.

anCnoc launched its peated collection earlier this year with three expressions of varying peat strength – ‘Rutter’, ‘Flaughter’ and ‘Tushkar’ – aiming to help drinkers find a peaty dram to suit their palate and to ‘shine a light’ on the dark, enigmatic world of peat.

With drinkers embracing the new collection , the ‘Cutter’ launch marks the start of a new anCnoc tradition which will see a new peated expression unveiled every year on 1st September, alongside a midnight celebration of anCnoc’s dark and mysterious side.

‘Cutter’ is the most peated of anCnoc’s single malts to date, with a phenol content of 20.5 PPM (parts per million). Light gold in appearance, it has an intense, thick and oily smoke structure on the nose which reveals a sharper, more medicinal phenolic layer with a piercing burst of fruity ripe peaches and just a touch of oak. It has an ashy taste, with slight apple-core bitterness and notes of leather and spicy vanilla lingering at the back, accompanied by sharper notes of pink grapefruit and ripe orchard fruits. A long, elegant finish brings a kaleidoscope of spicy and peaty notes that die out with a juicy burst and a loud call for another sip.

The new whisky’s traditional yet contemporary packaging retains the striking dark green glass bottle of the first peated releases but this time features a traditional ‘cutter’ peat tool emblazoned in silver on the pack’s distinctive black label and tube design.

anCnoc Assistant Brand Manager Stephanie Bridge commented: ‘Given the popularity of anCnoc as a contemporary, easy drinking malt whisky, we are thrilled with the reception our new dark, peaty side has had amongst drinkers since we launched the collection back in April this year. We wanted anCnoc’s peated malts to find their way to the many people out there who love whisky but think that peat is not for them, and initial feedback shows that we are starting to build the appeal of a peated dram amongst our drinkers which is good news. We are delighted to have Cutter join this exquisite collection, bringing a slightly smokier, stronger peated option that has all the quality, character and taste that every whisky made at Knockdhu distillery enjoys. The 1st September is now officially anCnoc Peaty day and a date to put in the diaries of whisky fans in years to come.’

2000 cases of anCnoc ‘Cutter’will be available online and in specialist and independent UK whisky retailers from 1st September, rrp£52. Cutter is bottled at 46% ABVand in its most natural state – neither chill-filtered nor coloured.

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What we say:

At 12 midnight on the stroke of the 1st of September, with the Edinburgh end of festival fireworks display still ringing in our ears, a group of inquisitive whisky afficonados (whiskyphiles if you like) gathered in the darkened hush of The Last Word to experience the launch of the latest in AnCnoc’s peaty range.

#LightOnDark

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Cutter – the latest in the AnCnoc peaty range is the peatiest so far; malted to around 50 ppm phenol and retaining around 20.5 ppm phenol in the bottle. The barley is malted using peat from the St Fergus peat bog at Blackhills on the Aberdeenshire coast. Working hard to obtain as much spirit as they can, the staff at Knockdhu distillery have braved the harsher peated malt, notorious for yielding much less alcohol per tonne of malted barley and producing noxious (more phenolic) by-products. They have attempted to achieve a reproducibility in their distillation and targeted the Croesol (2-Methoxyphenol) type phenolic compounds delivering that medicinal iodine and smoky wood rather than the Guaiacol-like compounds more associated with smoky spicy meaty flavours. The resultant peaty influence has an almost menthol-like quality which incorporates well with the light fruity AnCnoc spirit and their dedication to Bourbon cask maturation.

Colour:

Light/pale gold (apparently – it was a little too dark to see!)

Nose:

Damp moss and wet peat bog, floral violets, citrus lemon and lime foam, sweet oil-seed rape honey

Taste:

Smokey medicinal peat, iodine, Elastoplast and TCP vapours, parma violet sweeties with a little rose water sugar syrup, some cinnamon spice

Finish:

Long, cleansing (antiseptic?) citrus fruits, mildly spiced and ashen peat (like a spent brushwood campfire early the following morning)

Would I buy it:

Yes, this is a very interesting expression clearly not trying to be Islay-like but actually well thought out and constructed perfectly. The menthol like medicinal peaty quality sits like a high vaporous note on top of the sweet bourbon-matured AnCnoc spirit backbone. I’d actually really like to try this on ‘victims’ of blind tastings as it is so unlike any Islay or similar peated Island or Highland single malt that I have tried before. I suspect many people on blind-tasting may even guess (incorrectly of course) that this is from somewhere other than Scotland perhaps?

The Macallan 12 Year Old – Fine Oak ~ 40% (Maxxium Uk Ltd.)

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The Macallan 12 Year Old – Fine Oak ~ 40% (Maxxium Uk Ltd.)

40% ABV, Discontinued, was ~ £30-£40 per 70cl

Score: 84/100

What they say:

Triple cask matured in a complex combination of European and American oak seasoned with sherry and American oak seasoned with bourbon.

A lighter style of Macallan with flavours of citrus, vanilla and coconut.

The addition of American oak bourbon seasoned barrels imparts aromas and flavours slightly drier and more oaky than the American oak sherry casks, with more pronounced aromas and flavours of coconut, but still with the lighter colour and sweetness associated with American oak

12 Years old – the taste of a summers day

Colour: Rich straw

ABV40%

Nose: Complex with a hint of fruit and heather honey

Palate: Medium, balanced with fruit, oak and spice

Finish: Lingering with dried fruits, oak and spice

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What I say:

During a recent visit to the Glenturret Distillery (& Famous Grouse Experience) we were tipped-off by the shop staff as to some rather sought after miniatures from Edrington Group sister Distillery The Macallan. Amongst the remnants of the distillery shop stock were examples of 10 and 12 year old Sherry Oak and 12 year old Fine Oak expressions. With the imminent re-build of the Macallan Distillery and also discontinuation of several expressions from their core range (replaced by the 1824 series) we took this last gasp attempt to try some classic Macallan before it was lost for good!

Colour:

Full gold

Nose:

Sweet heather honey, butterscotch, toffee, cereal barley malt, fresh mown grass, orange pith/ expressed orange oil, citrusy lemon and melon

Taste:

Mouth filling and luxurious, sweet honey and fruity melon and mango, old-fashioned pink lemonade, vanilla crème brulee, hints of nutmeg spice and caramelised sugars

Finish:

Medium, oaky wood and sweetened citrus fruits

Overall:

As it is discontinued there is not much point asking ‘Would I buy it again?’. The Fine Oak range from Macallan was an interesting experimental move by the Distillery away from their preferred pure Sherry cask maturation. This allowed a range of expressions to be released highlighting more of their spirit qualities when matured in bourbon casks or mixed cask maturations. Following the release of the 1824 (chromatic; i.e. colour based) range, several age-statement expressions from the Sherry oak and Fine Oak ranges have been discontinued. Rumoured to be due to a lack of aged spirit available from the Macallan, the Distillery appears to be addressing this issue by rebuilding into a much more modern establishment, reportedly costing £100 million and powered by Green energy (as well as supplying local homes too). As usual with re-builds I hope the essence of Macallan is retained during this renovation.

Read all about it at the Spirits Business here: The Macallan to close distillery and open another

 

Glenmorangie Signet ~ 46% (Moet-Hennessy)

glenmorangie_signet

 Glenmorangie Signet ~ 46% (Moet-Hennessy)

46% ABV, £125 for 70cl available from the Whisky Exchange or £9.90 per dram at Michael Neave Kitchen and Whisky Bar

Score: 90/100

Glenmorangie Signet

What they say:

A fusion of unique and rare elements, and clouded in secrecy, Signet is the culmination of a lifetime’s experience. A blend of our oldest whisky – distilled over thirty years ago when malting still occurred on site – and spirit matured in a selection of the world’s finest casks, this undoubtedly is the richest whisky in our range. Of course, whilst the exact secrets of its production are known only to our whisky creators, we can tell you that Signet’s melting sweetness and explosive spiciness is, at least in part, caused by our unique roasted ‘chocolate’ barley malt and the ‘designer casks’ made bespoke for Glenmorangie from American white oak. Non chill-filtered

Tasting Notes

Aroma

Aroma: A strong Aruba espresso fused with a treacly plum pudding, rich with sherry, and candied orange peel.

Taste

Taste: A contrast of rich sweetness with an explosive crackle of sizzling spices and bitter mocha.

Finish

Finish: A fresh spring-like breeze of mint with a bright citrus lemony-green quality.

Glenmo Signet - Michael Neave

What I say:

So on the 21st August 2014 TheWhiskyphiles.com was officially 1 year old. Unfortunately as the main protagonist of the blog I was incumbent at the Scottish Immunology Group meeting in St. Andrews for a couple of days and unable to celebrate our blog birthday in true whiskystyle. To make up for this and for several other more spurious reasons (such as visiting Royal Mile Whiskies to offload my Whisky Fringe £10 off voucher before it expired), Mrs (actually Miss!) Whiskyphiles decided to make good on her promise to return us to Michael Neave’s Kitchen and Whisky Bar (scene of The Edinburgh Whisky Blog 5th Birthday Bash). After a truly fantastic meal I opted for something from the whisky list for dessert (a habit I am rapidly becoming accustomed to!). I opted for the Glenmorangie Signet – a bottle I am unlikely ever to buy due to its super-£100 price tag (~ £125 at current reckoning). Reportedly constructed from some casks aged over 30 years, distilled at a time when floor-maltings still took place at Glenmorangie, and including some whisky distilled from roasted chocolate malt (a method more commonly used in the brewing industry), mixed together with some rather unusual and mysterious cask maturations. Perhaps this should have been named the Glenmorangie Enigma…

Colour:

Full coppery gold

Nose:

Heather and orange blossom honey, chocolate coated cinder toffee, Terry’s dark chocolate orange, fresh pine wood shavings

Taste:

Silky smooth molten toffee butter, heather honey, ginger and orange marmalade, cinnamon, candied peel, brandy butter and Scottish tablet

Finish:

Long sweet oak and honey

Would I buy it:

By the dram again probably yes, a whole bottle sadly not at this price. Really very little to gripe about with this whisky (other than the price). This ticked all boxes and rang all bells. Complex but well-constructed and so infinitely drinkable, almost far too easily-drinkable it made my wallet twitch. An interesting experiment this delivers oodles of chocolate and signature Glenmorangie flavours with only a hint of possibly virgin oak casks? The end result was a perfect dessert and matched beautifully with a small selection of sweet treats and chocolates including tablet and dark chocolate mint crisp – the sort of attention to detail we just love in our food and drink here at TheWhiskyphiles.com! Happy Birthday to us.

33.121 ‘Barbecued pork on rosemary skewers’ ~ 59.0% (SMWS)

SMWS

33.121 ‘Barbecued pork on rosemary skewers’ ~ 59.0% (SMWS)

59% ABV, £55.70 per 70cl or £6.50 per dram

Score: 86/100

33.121

What they say:

Cask No. 33.121

Aromas gradually emerged – thyme, marjoram, tarragon, sage; puff candy sweetness, light smoke, sugared almonds, grilled pork and tinned peaches. On the palate, more definite smoke as waves of peat swelled in the mouth – barbecued pork, skewered on rosemary sprigs, fabric Elastoplasts, herbal cigarettes, coal and pleasant nippy heat at the end. With water, the nose became sweeter – sticky Madagascar vanilla, perfumed floral soap or pot-pourri and something of the sea. The reduced palate was sweetly delicious, with adequate smoke to balance – smoked pigeon breast with a vanilla, juniper and dark chocolate sauce; red grapefruit, ash and chalk. Islay’s first distillery, alphabetically.

Drinking tip: Milder than usual, but interesting – when you have skinned your knee and the nurse is busy.

Date Distilled: 1 July 04

Colour: Toasted golden oak

Age: 8 years 

Cask Type: First fill ex-bourbon barrel

Whisky Region: Islay

What I say:

So this was my first SMWS dram purchased since joining the society. We picked out this dram purely by name at the Bar at Ducks in Aberlady and then played guess the Distillery before looking up the code and details surrounding this cask.

Colour:

Full gold

Nose:

BBQ spare ribs, smokey peat, lactic acid, cereal barley malt, beef and smokey bacon crisps, marmite, soy sauce, raspberry balsamic vinegar

Taste:

BBQ pork or smoked bacon lardons, meaty, malty and mildly spicy, marmite spare ribs (Malaysian style), peanut satay, golden syrup, honey smoked pork, honeyed & salted cashew nuts and oven-roasted bouquet garni (thyme, lavender, rosemary, bay leaf, tarragon)

Finish:

Medium length, lots of very pleasant fragrant wood smoke and residual savoury sweetness

Would I buy it:

Discovered at zero full bottles left, so sadly couldn’t purchase a bottle. Would have been very tempted to, if it had still been available. We were pleasantly surprised that this was from Ardbeg though it was distinctively a Kildalton malt from the outset. The sweetness and smoothness from such a young malt was a real bonus and the delicate nature of the peat-influence in the finish was simply divine. Our initial impression was possibly Laphroaig as it was peanut’y but lacking that real creosote flavour, then Lagavulin as it was malty and lactic and quite meaty in character, and finally pleasantly surprised to deduce it was Ardbeg due to the perfect combination of meaty and sweet.

 

Kilchoman Coull Point ~ 46% (Travel Retail Exclusive)

Kilchoman Coull Point

Kilchoman Coull Point ~ 46% (Travel Retail Exclusive)

46% ABV, £44.99 for 70cl

Score: 83/100

Kilchoman Coull Point

What they say:

Continuing the tradition of Kilchoman whiskies being named after landmarks near the distillery, Coull Point is a rugged headland just half a mile north of Machir Bay.  Coull Point is a limited edition bottling exclusively available from 14 World of Whiskies stores at airports across the UK priced at £44.99. Coull Point is available from World of Whiskies stores at Heathrow T1-T5, both terminals at Gatwick and Manchester, Stansted, Newcastle, Glasgow, Edinburgh and Aberdeen.

What I say:

Kilchoman’s Coull Point expression is the first foray into the travel retail exclusive market from Kilchoman distillery on Islay. Reportedly made up from 4 and 5 year old whiskies matured primarily in Bourbon barrels, though the 4 year old is finished for around 3-4 months in Oloroso sherry casks before its marriage with the 5 year old pure bourbon matured whisky prior to bottling. The result is not only possibly one of the older but also more complex constructed expressions to come out of Kilchoman so far. Combine this with the relatively low sale price obtainable via duty free shopping and Kilchoman could well be onto a winner with this one.

Colour:

Light rose gold

Nose:

New hay, stable/barnyard, slightly lactic, sweet, marshmallows, vanilla, peaty, toffee, coconut, roasted chicory, beefy, furniture polish and medicinal iodine (complex and evolving)

Taste:

Earthy peat, cereal barley malt, masses of sweet vanilla custard, peanut/satay, cinnamon and chilli pepper spices build, minimal Oloroso influence detected

Finish:

Long, peaty ash and spice

Would I buy it:

We were very impressed with this expression, this really hits the spot and has a distinctly (young) Ardbeggian or to me Lagavulian reminiscence. The combination of malty and lactic peaty whisky with that minimal Oloroso sherry influence places it firmly in the 10yo Lagavulin refill sherry butt taste region. Another hit from Kilchoman – well done guys!

Thanks also to Adam Irvine for kindly providing the sample.

Bacardi single malt range releases announced: Aberfeldy, Aultmore, Craigellachie, Deveron & Royal Brackla

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Bacardi Group owners of Dewar’s and William Lawsons blends have announced the release of a number of single malts from distilleries previously best known for supplying their malts to said blends.

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Aberfeldy

Following the re-packaging of the Aberfeldy 12 and 21 year old; an Aberfeldy 16 year old heavily sherried and Abefeldy 30 year old Marsala cask finished expressions are scheduled to join the stable range from Aberfeldy by 2015

Aultmore

From Aultmore distillery, Aultmore 12 year old and Aultmore 25 year old exresssions are expected to be launched at 46% ABV non-chill filtered and free from caramel colouring. Additionally a similar Aultmore 21 year old is scheduled for launch on the travel retail exclusive market

Craigellachie

From the Craigellachie distillery 13, 17 and 23 year old expressions will form the stable range with a 19 year old travel retail exclusive. Plans are afoot to bottle a Craigellachie 11 year old exclusively for the nearby Craigellachie hotel with the intention of forming an impromptu distillery visitor centre at this location.

Macduff

From the Macduff distillery Glen Deveron whisky will be repackaged as Deveron (as Diageo still retain the trademark name of Macduff whisky). A Deveron 12, 18 and 25 year old expression stable range is scheduled for release in January 2015

Royal Brackla

Royal Brackla distillery will be represented by 12, 16 and 21 year old expressions expected to be launched in spring 2015

Making a minimum of 16 new expressions to hit the market in the coming months

 

Thanks to the Spirits Business for details. See original article here: http://www.thespiritsbusiness.com/2014/08/bacardi-makes-unprecedented-move-into-single-malt-scotch-whisky/2/

Arran 16 Years Old 1997 Cask#2 Marsala Finish ~ 46% (Berry Bros. & Rudd)

Arran 16yo BBR 1997

Arran 16 Years Old 1997 Cask#2 Marsala Finish ~ 46% (Berry Bros. & Rudd)

46% ABV, £63.95 available from The Whisky Exchange

Score: 75/100

Arran 16yo BBR 1997

What they say:

A 1997 vintage whisky from Arran, bottled by veteran spirits experts Berry Brothers and Rudd. This was bottled in 2013 at 16 years of age, having spent an unspecified period being finished in a cask which used to hold Marsala.

What I say:

Arran whiskies are like buses for me – you wait and wait for ages and then several come along at once. I guess this is the nature of a reasonable established distillery marking its age up the years. Soon we will be expecting another flurry of Arrans having reached the legal (well legal here in the UK) age to drink themselves. So roll on the 18 year olds… Whoa! wait – before that lest do some of the 16 and 17 year old expressions some justice. This here is a 16 year old 1997 vintage bottled in 2013 having spent some of its life finishing in a Marsala wine cask under the watchful gaze of the folks at Berry Bros.

Colour:

Yellow/amber gold

Nose:

Toffee and caramel, fruity peaches, putty/linseed oil, butterscotch, marzipan, fresh strawberry, tangerine, salty green olives, toffee apples, candy floss and toffee coated popcorn – all the scents of the fairground

Taste:

Salty and savoury, slight prickle of spicy nutmeg, burnt or over-caramelised toffee/sugar, engine oil with smoke, coffee and cocoa edging on bitterness

Finish:

Long butterscotch and toffee

Would I buy it again:

Possibly not. A very interesting dram all the same but I have been finding any Marsala cask finish whisky slightly unsavoury. Strange because I think my issue is the slightly savoury nature it imparts – it pretends to be umami and meaty but ends up like olives or nut loaf (it just isnae meat). There was a huge complexity to this dram and it really took me to the fairground with the diesel engined rides and candy floss and popcorn stalls overwhelming my nose. On tasting though, I felt like I fell out of the fairground and into the sea and came out with a green olive in my popcorn and seaweed on my toffee apple… Redeems itself on the finish but by then the damage was done. My instinctual score was a 75 but I later switched to 80 as it grew on me and I anticipated the initially unexpected. You’ll either love it or no.

Bunnahabhain 16 Years Old 1997 Heavily Peated #5512 ~ 50.3% (Signatory)

Bunna 1997 Peated bottle shot

Bunnahabhain 16 Years Old 1997 Heavily Peated #5512 ~ 50.3% (Signatory)

50.3% ABV, £79.95 available from Royal Mile Whiskies

Score: 84/100

Bunnahabhain 16yo Peated 1997 Signatory

What they say:

Distilled on 11/12/1997 and matured in a single hogshead cask #5512 this produced 285 bottles on outturn on 09/05/2014.

Tasting notes from the RMW staff

Nose: Heavy and rich with a sensible and enjoyable level of peat. Malty and sweetened butter notes breaking through.

Palate: Lots going on on the palate with an initial sweet brine and peat rush leaving a peppery mouthfeel and taste.

Finish: Dry, dusty chocolate

Overall: An interesting and enjoyable dram which scored highly in a blind tasting.

Bunna 16yo Peated 1997

What I say:

Every year Bunnahabhain switch over to distillation of spirit from a batch heavily peated malted barley (one would presume from the Port Ellen maltings on Islay, though mainland maltings will happily provide malted barley to similarly high phenolic ppm [peat levels in layman's terms]), a far cry from their usual pretty much un-peated standard malted barley. In fact I suspect most of the peat normally in Bunnahabhain expressions arises from the water source used rather than introduced when drying the malted barley. So this is what you get when Bunnahabhain produce a more traditional Islay style whisky.

Colour:

Amber gold

Nose:

Sweet honey and toffee, cereal malted barley, earthy and smoky peat

Taste:

Fruity apple and pear, honey, heather, butterscotch, toffee, oaty malty barley and lashings of firey peat smoke with a massively robust and chewy mouthfeel, some sea spray, brine and salt caramel

Finish:

Long, although the peat lingers to the finish it is so powerful up-front in the nose and palate you almost forget about it, but it does linger

Would I buy it again:

Yes! I still prefer the traditional ‘un-peated’ style of Bunnahabhain which they do so well, however this captures the essence of that and incorporates a healthy dose of peat smoke too. Rather than overpowering it feels more like drinking standard Bunna at a barbecue on an Islay beach bonfire with a cigar… nom nom nom… I would definitely recommend anyone try a peated Bunna (either the Toiteach official bottling or Indie bottlings like this one from Signatory) just to taste the difference.

As We Get It – Highland Whisky – 67.9% (Ian McLeod & Co. Ltd.)

AWGI bottle shot

As We Get It – Highland Whisky – 67.9% (Ian McLeod & Co. Ltd.)

67.9% ABV, £43.50 for 70cl available from Whisky Galore@ The Green Welly Stop, Tyndrum

Score: 84/100

800x1200-AWGI-Highland-8YO-58_9%25-vol_0

What they say:

‘As We Get It’

Single Malt Scotch Whiskies

‘Straight From The Cask’

A well-respected brand in Scotland, these unique and quirky Highland and Islay single malt Scotch whiskies are made the old fashioned way.

A ‘valuable’ addition to any whisky collection, ‘As We Get It’ is bottled straight from the cask in the traditional manner.

Unchillfiltered for a richer, smoother taste, both whiskies’ colour and strength change with each bottling, so no two bottlings are ever the same.

Traditional packaging complements the ‘As We Get It’ theme.

As We Get It 67.9%

What I say:

This is the 67.9% ABV / 119° proof Highland single malt which is lacking the ‘Aged 8 Years’ statement on the label.

Colour:

Dark amber ruby

Nose:

Christmas cake, fruity sherry, cocoa powder and strong dark chocolate

Taste:

(Requires water!) At 67.9% this is incredibly strong and overwhelms the palate; however a liberal dosage of water reveals Christmas cake or Christmas pudding, plum, cherry, fig, honey sweet, chocolate and cocoa almost a little bitter like mocha (chocolate/coffee)

Finish:

Medium long with deep fruits and cocoa powder

Would I buy it again:

Once diluted this is a cracker of a sherry bomb dram, most likely from Glenfarclas Distillery was the consensus opinion amongst those tasting it though this would assume that McLeod’s don’t make the distinction of Speyside being a specific sub-area of the Highland region. Regardless, this is highly alcoholic and massively influenced by the sherry-cask it was matured in; you can water this down a long way and still get plenty of flavour from this. Be very wary of drinking this ‘As You Get It’! Once diluted it is a very fine dram and I would be surprised if it wasn’t still 8 years old.

Gentleman Jack (Official Bottling)

Gentleman Jack and TWGC

Gentleman Jack (Official Bottling)

40% ABV, £30 for 70cl

Score: 83/100

gentleman-jack_0

What they say:

Just like Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey and Jack Daniel’s Single Barrel, Gentleman Jack is charcoal mellowed before going into the barrel. Gentleman Jack, however, receives an additional “blessing” when it is charcoal mellowed again after reaching maturity – making it the only whiskey in the world to be charcoal mellowed twice, giving it ultimate smoothness. Gentleman Jack is full-bodied with fruit and spices, and its finish is silky, warm, and pleasant. When you drink Gentleman Jack, do so with pride, for this is the whiskey a gentleman orders.

Gentleman Jack and TWGC

What I say:

Whiskey not whisky, today we are sampling Gentleman Jack, the twice charcoal mellowed expression from Jack Daniel’s Distillery in Tennessee. As part of our virtual world tour of whisk(e)y we sample some of Jack’s finest.

Jack Daniel's Sampler

Colour:

Amber gold

Nose:

Nail polish (old) acetone, wood furniture polish, gentle fruity oranges and apples, sweet honey

Taste:

Vanilla, coconut, orange oil, beeswax, honey, wood polish, incredibly smooth and almost watery feeling at first but given time this develops a depth and body

Finish:

Medium, sweet with oaky wood

Would I buy it again:

Yes, this is an excellent highly drinkable expression, much more refined and silky smooth than the Old No.7.

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