Whisky Review: Glenglassaugh Torfa

Category: Highland single malt scotch whisky

Origin: Glenglassaugh Distillery

Bottling: Brown-Forman

ABV: 50%

Cost: £42.73 buy from Master of Malt

glenglassaugh-torfa-whisky

What they say:

Torfa

At Glenglassaugh, in addition to the traditional production, we also produce a very limited quantity of whisky using richly peated malted barley as the cereal varietal. The malted barley has been dried in the traditional way, over peat infused kilns, giving the whisky its unique smoky flavour. Glenglassaugh ‘Torfa’, with its peaty, phenolic nature, is a unique expression, and is quite different to the usual style of whisky produced in the Highlands.

Colour: Gleaming yellow gold.

Nose: Vivid, sweet, sooty campfire smoke and sea air infuses zest of lime, apricot jam and ripe soft fruits; all gently warmed by hints of stem ginger and cracked black pepper.

Palate: An eloquent, sweet coastal peat smoke engulfs candied peel over melon, pineapple and roasted red apples. Oat biscuits, hints of heather honey and a gentle cigar box spice all combine to give a terrific balance to the expressive smoky character.

Finish: A heady, yet elegant, harmony of distinct coastal peat and striking spiced fruit flavours.

Glenglassaugh - Tasting in front of distillery of Revival and Torfa

What I say:

Sampled during our visit to Glenglassaugh distillery. After touring the distillery we sampled a little of the new make spirit after exiting the rear of the stillhouse and as a prelude to sampling the Revival and Torfa expressions overlooking the scenic Sandend Bay.

Appearance:

Antique/yellow gold (6/20)

Nose:

Unmistakably peaty, but presents initially with a grassy and citrus character with lemon and lime, softened Demerara sugar in molten butter, cereal barley, slightly metallic and mineralic before earthy, mossy peat and eventually smoke

Taste:

Fruit and cereal/grass present a balanced or almost neutral sweetness, lemon, lime precede melon and apple and possibly a hint of tropical pineapple, white pepper, almond butter, cereal biscuity barley, mossy, mineralic including sea spray, metallic copper and peat

Finish:

Medium, buttery citrus and grass, softly peaty and mineralic

Overall:

An interesting insight into peated Glenglassaugh production, when released I had high hopes for this expression as young peat can work very well. Something doesn’t quite work for me in this whisky and it is still a little immature or unbalanced and the peaty element feels a little disjointed with the other flavours so it is working against rather than with them perhaps? Maybe a few more years in the cask will resolve this conflict and round this out a little?

Score: 82/100

Don’t take my word for it:

Bloggers submit a link to your review