Review: Strathclyde 25 Years Old 1988 – G10.6 The Spice Temple

Category: Single grain scotch whisky

Origin: Strathclyde Distillery

Bottling: Scotch Malt Whisky Society Cask #G10.6 The Spice Temple

ABV: 56.0%

Cost: £66.00 from SMWS

Score: 78/100

Scotch Malt Whisky Society

What they say:

Cask No. G10.6

The nose was initially rich with rum soaked fruits, golden syrup and toffee sauce. Pop corn, and crumble topping made with Nice biscuits emerged next and then balsa wood with light engine oil. The panel found the taste warming and exotic; chilli and orange oil mingled with Tiger Balm and licorice. Water opened curious notes of yacht varnish and warmed magazine paper. Roasted pork marinated with a cinnamon rub and plum sauce on the nose developed into five spice, star anise and curry powder. Eucalyptus, dried rose petals and polished brass evoked the sense of wandering through a temple.

Drinking tip: When you feel like something unusual

Date Distilled: 15 June 1988 Colour: Banana gold Age: 25 years Flavour : Spicy & dry Cask Type: Refill ex-bourbon barrel Whisky Region: Single Cask Grain Whisky Outturn: 128 bottles

SMWS G10.6 The Spice Temple

What I say:

Presented as Dram #3 at the WOLS Mystery Whisky Tasting in spring 2015. A 25 year old single cask, single grain sample from Strathclyde distillery (SMWS Distillery code #G10)

Colour:

Yellow antique gold (5/20), medium sized tears, oily

Nose:

Spicy, like an apothecary shop or spice market, cinnamon and nutmeg, clove, dry and dusty, almost chalky, bubblegum and sweet caramel – like something I associate with overly caramel-coloured foodstuffs? toffee crème caramel, hints of zesty citrus

Taste:

Light in mouthfeel, spicy and zesty, pure cinnamon powder and freshly grated nutmeg compete with cayenne pepper and dried chilli flakes, fruity orange zest and candied peel, ginger, curry leaf, star anise, clove, eucalyptus, liquorice and menthol, very drying, lemon and lime citrus juice

Finish:

Short, drying and spicy herbal citrus

Overall:

Another intense Strathclyde grain, this time much more spicy and less sweet than the last I sampled. Not really to my liking, but another single grain exemplar that shows that at least in intensity grain whisky can match malts. There still feels like something missing (which I can only assume is malted cereal barley) from the palate.